A humble view on Marketing.. Splitting Wood

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There’s Chopping Wood & there’s Marketing.
I know! Your thinking what has splitting wood got to do with marketing?
Well lets see what splitting entails without the jargon…

Using wood to burn has a lot of benefits, especially if you have a free supply;)
For one it is so called carbon neutral, by that I mean it only puts back the carbon into the atmosphere the tree took out.
But thats not my point today.

Let me explain,
You can chop wood or logs in a variety of ways however going at it like a nutter will only over excert you and leave you declining another time or putting the task off.

Preparation is the key. Why its only chopping wood? You say.
Well for instance
Firstly the logs your going to chop/split need to be a managable thickness and once split fit in your log burner or fire place.
The wood is better split once dry, although some wood is better split straight away after cutting then stacked to dry before use. (Seasoned)
You need a good axe or wood bomb and these need to be sharp, otherwize you will be chopping away with alot more energy and the axe will bounce all over tbe place.
A good block is needed too. This stops the axe from hitting the floor and stops you missing and hitting your leg 🙂 And you dont have to bend down so far either, a bonus for us old ones.
Finally placing the log so it is stable on the block before giving it a Thor like thump with the axe.
Then its down to the type of wood your splitting. Hardwood or softwood. Has it got knots in or how hard does it need hitting.
Until you’ve split wood you will not understand this but it really does matter where you aim your axe. Ive seen many just take the axe and swing it as hard as they can at the wood only to see it get firmly stuck or bounce off in all directions, sometimes missing altogether as they close their eyes and just wade in. The axe stail hitting the wood and snapping and sometimes belting themselves. Not a good move.
And the worse scenario flailing in without regard for those around them hurtling pieces of wood everywhere and not giving a flying axe about anyone or anything within the vacinity! Will anyone lift the wood for you to split if you have no regard for their shins, fingers or toes.
If you do, their help may save your back from aching and you may get alot more split in the long run. 🙂

There is no hard and fast rule but if you look at the wood there are rings, aiming across the rings towards the side will cause a split. Aiming with the grain will get it stuck and hitting diagonal will usually see the axe bounce all over the place.
Once split, a wood disc can then be chopped up easily into cheese like segments and over time, with practice, you realise that alot less effort is needed to do this once you realise the knack to splitting wood.
Then theres always mechanical log splitters. But until you understand the how toos, these too can leave you thinking I may just buy coal in future or even just get it pre split which will cost you more in the long run. But having said that, can free you up to make fires too

So.. Marketing!
Is it free?
Do you get back what you put in?
Have you prept?
Got the right tools?
Just flew in at it?
Gone in all guns blazing?
Looked at your target?
Hit one area , bounced & given up?
Got stuck, run out of ideas or just kept on hitting the same target with no success?
Are you over hitting it, are your targets ignoring you?
Have you helped others to understand, been there for them?
Learning and testing diferent areas ?
Using your feedback to create new approaches?
Maybe asked for assistance or had your techniques critiqued?
Looked at all angles and learnt the easy way?
Or given up, delegated or got a pro in?

Yep sounds like chopping wood to me #smiles
Go try it!
#bighugz
Drew

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